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I am new to N7 - I have some prior limited experience with N5. I have the Silvana di Gregorio paper on Using NVIVO for Literature Reviews. I'd apprecaite some guidance on the best way to use N7 for literature rievews. Is it best to orgnise by author to topic etc. Any guidance would be appreciated. Thanks

 

John :)

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I would also like to know if there are any hints on how best to use N7 to assist literature review.

 

I currently have an Endnote database where I have been entering 'research notes' into each reference I have read and reviewed. I use the search capacity of Endnote to find articles where any field contains the keyword representing what I'm looking to write about, so I have an array of articles to look through - and jog my memory. However I want something more structured.

 

I have read the following article:

Reflecting on the strategic use of CAQDAS to manage and report on the qualitative research process

Mark Wickham and Megan Woods

The Qualitative Report, 10(4), 2005, 687-702

 

These authors seem to have used NUDIST well to assist lit reviewing and have described numerous benefits to doing so, but not the exact structure of how they did it. And they were using NUDIST.

 

I'm interested in how N7 can best be used for this function. Can anyone assist?

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I would also like to know if there are any hints on how best to use N7 to assist literature review.

 

I currently have an Endnote database where I have been entering 'research notes' into each reference I have read and reviewed. I use the search capacity of Endnote to find articles where any field contains the keyword representing what I'm looking to write about, so I have an array of articles to look through - and jog my memory. However I want something more structured.

 

I have read the following article:

Reflecting on the strategic use of CAQDAS to manage and report on the qualitative research process

Mark Wickham and Megan Woods

The Qualitative Report, 10(4), 2005, 687-702

 

These authors seem to have used NUDIST well to assist lit reviewing and have described numerous benefits to doing so, but not the exact structure of how they did it. And they were using NUDIST.

 

I'm interested in how N7 can best be used for this function. Can anyone assist?

 

Hi I did go the N7 route and am pleased with what I've found - I begin interviews early 2007 and am using N7 just now for literature work. Note I call it 'work' and not review as I am stumbling my way into this. I'm sure what i've done is not too elegant. I use externals to make notes against set headings such as epistemology - purpose of article - essentially whatever headings / categoreis I use to interrogate the literature I'm reading - then I autocode to these headings - I may do further coding as well. I really could use some guidance. John

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Hi John.

 

That sounds like an interesting way of doing it. I'm not sure whether the separate references should be "cases", so they can have attributes (like, say, year of publication, place where research conducted, general methodology, epistemology... etc). I understand that the notes I may on references could be "documents"... or as you have done, I could represent the references as "externals".

 

At least you say you are "pleased with what you found". N7 for lit review seems to have great promise, perhaps it needs an expert to just put people on the right track - since it's not the conventional use of the software, it isn't well explained in any of the tutorials I have found.

 

A little advice would be good! Better to get the system right now than to have to overhaul it 6 months down the track.

 

cheers

monica

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Hi John.

 

That sounds like an interesting way of doing it. I'm not sure whether the separate references should be "cases", so they can have attributes (like, say, year of publication, place where research conducted, general methodology, epistemology... etc). I understand that the notes I may on references could be "documents"... or as you have done, I could represent the references as "externals".

 

At least you say you are "pleased with what you found". N7 for lit review seems to have great promise, perhaps it needs an expert to just put people on the right track - since it's not the conventional use of the software, it isn't well explained in any of the tutorials I have found.

 

A little advice would be good! Better to get the system right now than to have to overhaul it 6 months down the track.

 

cheers

monica

 

 

Hi Monica

I like your idea better - i've not gone so far that I can't back up. Are we the only ones uinsg N7 for literatrure reviews !!!!

 

John

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Hi John & Monica

 

No, you're not alone! I'm trying to get my head around it as well. Have either of you gone further with your work on this?

 

Mon, I like your idea of using cases for notes about the literature. I'm making the description the number of my Endnote library.

 

I'm thinking of using 'see also links' for notes on different parts of the lit review and a memo for a rough working draft that will end up being exported to Word.

 

 

I'm starting this today so will report back in a few weeks to let you know how it's going

 

Cheers

 

Jo

 

 

 

Hi Monica

I like your idea better - i've not gone so far that I can't back up. Are we the only ones uinsg N7 for literatrure reviews !!!!

 

John

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Hi,

 

I do not think having every document as a case would be a good idea. That's not what cases were designed for. Instead, what about having an external linked to your paper (pdf file I suppose) in which you can have all that information in standard headings so you can automatically code.

 

Now since you might already have that information on your EndNote library, perhaps somebody in the forum could tell us if it is possible to import it, not as attributes, but as a sorce documet... Is this making any sense?

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To import the Endnote data as a source document - in Endnote use the File|Export... menu and export to txt or rtf.

 

Then import the document into NVivo in the usual way.

 

I'm not sure how useful this would be, though, as the file simply contains a listing without formatting or headings, like this:

 

Bryce, J. B. (1921). Modern democracies. London: Macmillan and Co.

Bulkley, K., & Fisler, J. (2003). A decade of charter schools: from theory to practice. Educational Policy, 17(3), 317-342.

Cahill, H., Shaw, G., & Wyn, J. (2004). Section 5 - Literature Review. In H. Cahill, G. Shaw, J. Wyn & G. Smith (Eds.), Translating caring into action: an evaluation of the Victorian Catholic Education Student Welfare Professional Development Initiative. Melbourne: Australian Youth Research Centre, University of Melbourne.

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hi,

 

I have been meaning to contribute to this debate, so far I personally disagree with the use of Nvivo as a Literature Review tool just because of the effort and time it would take. However, if you are really into it and have the time to do it this is the way I found it most useful before giving up, I gave up just because it is just as easy, to me, doing it in MsWord:

 

step 1: create each reference as a document, if you wanted to automate an endnote file you could export as .txt file bearing in mind that you want to choose the DESIRED output, the 'select all' ends up like this:

 

Reference Type: Journal Article

Record Number: 196

Author: Angermuller, Johannes

Year: 2005

Title: "Qualitative" Methods of Social Research in France:

Reconstructing the Actor, Deconstructing the Subject

Journal: Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum:

Volume: 6

Issue: 3

Pages: 19

Date: September 2005

Keywords: qualitative sociology, interpretive and

hermeneutic methods, ethnography, discourse

analysis, linguistics, Foucault, Lacan, Althusser,

pragmatics, France

Abstract: This contribution gives an overview of the

numerous tendencies of open non-standardised

social research in France. For various reasons,

the label "qualitative" seems to be less distinctive

than in the Anglo-Saxon world and Germany. While

the interpretive-hermeneutic (verstehend) approaches

have recently come to play a certain role as

a result of international reception, a strong tradition

that does not fit into the quantitative-qualitative

divide has to be noted: discourse analysis which I

will label "quasi-qualitative". A comparison between

the interpretive-hermeneutic tendencies of qualitative

sociology and the semiologically informed

strands of discourse analysis reveals fundamental

differences as well as points of convergence.

URL: http://www.qualitative-research.net/fqs-te...5/05-3-19-e.htm

 

step 2: using MS Word or your favourite word processor, find and replace each 'reference type, author, year, etc', and turn them into headings according to your priorities

 

step 3: import as documents into nvivo

 

step 4: autocode

 

step 5: now you have replicated what endnote already does for you but with NVIVO. next step is up to you, you can apply attributes for keywords, importance, or whatever your needs may be and from there to infinity, relationships, coding, memos, annotations, etc.

 

 

personally that's too time consuming, I prefer having a way of 'coding' my thoughts in the Word file I work on and use highlighting(different colours) for the following, :

 

Author

Keywords

Comments

Coined expressions

Theoretical notes

Mail communications

(one day this could be autocoded)

 

please keep the users posted as to how you get on with this and maybe, why not?, one day we'll see if it pays off well for those brave people who persevered.

 

 

:unsure:

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Hi Monica

I like your idea better - i've not gone so far that I can't back up. Are we the only ones uinsg N7 for literatrure reviews !!!!

 

John

 

 

Hi - I started using N7 about 6 months ago, for a lit review. I have a lot of stored files on my hard drive and a heap of books, of course. I create externals, and make a note in those of direct quotes I might want to use. I make memos on the externals, and code the externals and the memos at nodes. So far, I'm finding that helpful. Haven't yet made my reference list, and should do that before it gets much bigger, but previously used ProCite. I now also have Scholar's Aid, but haven't tried importing or exporting between that and Nvivo yet.

 

The other procedure I found useful was to trawl through my stored material - several years worth of saved resources from doing a distance degree - and identify what I might want for my thesis. I created a Word doc, saved to my desktop, and inserted hyperlinks to the material I knew I wanted, with a brief description including author and date. The hyperlinks are arranged under section headings relating to the subject areas I am reviewing, and associated headings for the context and framework of analysis. It took a while, and is a work in progress as it has to be amended when I come across more new material. But that index of hyperlinks is also saved in N7 as a source, so I can easily remind myself of other files and jump about without trying to remember where they are stored.

 

I am new at this, and it's probably an amateur and clunky solution, but I can't afford the Nvivo training courses at the moment, so I'm teaching myself. I find Lyn Richard's book useful. I did go through the tutorials, but they aren't so useful for me as I am not coding interviews this time. Previously used another programme for that. EZYTEXT I think it was called - useful but not as flexible as Nvivo

 

Cecilia

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To follow up, I never ended up using NVivo for my lit review stuff... mainly because my poor laptop, at the time, could not copy with running the software. I got a new laptop and am now finally making use of NVivo for coding and analysing interview text data... and have instead stuck to my Endnote system for literature.

 

I'm still getting my head around the various possibilities of NVivo with interview data. I think once I've completed this first project on NVivo, I'll have a better idea of the best system to apply it to references!

 

How did everyone else go?

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Hi there,

 

as I mentioned back then I wasn't going to spend time on working around Nvivo to do a lit review, I had sufficient exposure to realise that the old-fashioned way is best for ME. and I think this is important for folk to realise, what works for some doesn't for others.

 

even doing it the old-fashioned way (taking notes, etc) it is still difficult to find your best workflow. so far I've found that taking notes in margins of papers, white A4 sheets for books or other materials I should not write on (these are kept with the source at all times whenever possible), works best as long as I input these into my research document in a timely manner.

 

with respect to nvivo, our project at the time worked a treat (not saying it was easy) but nvivo did help to put together 80 hours of transcript and analyse them properly.

 

 

:unsure:

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My advice re using NVivo for a literature review is: if it's a body of literature to which you will return, then it's worth doing. If it's a one-off literature review, then make headings in WOrd, and use the document map to navigate as you go through the literature, then outline view to sort the sections you are writing about.

If you do use NVivo (and I do so for two areas of literature), then there are different pathways depending on whether you are working from notes e.g. made in Endnote or perhaps Word, where you are likely to have multiple references in the one document, or from .pdf files, where you are likely to have a separate document for each reference. There are notes free for download on my website which give detailed instructions about ways of handling extracting notes from EndNote (or ProCIte) and turning them into suitable documents for NVIvo - essentially allowing you to convert the author name/s and date into headings to facilitate auto coding to create case nodes. For pdfs, I would save each document with the author and date as its name, and create a case for each.

The benefit of doing these things is that you can always identify the author and date for any coded segment, either from the title of the document for single reference documents, or by hovering over the coding density barfor multiple reference documents. Secondly, you can create attributes, as someone above has suggested, for year of publication (then group these into sets for decades, perhaps), country of origin, type of article, etc etc. Thus, for my mixed mehtods literature database, it is now simple for me to see changes in discussions about epistemology (or any other topic) over time, or to compare North American with European views on any topic, etc.

Incidentally, I find Dragon dictate very useful when I'm making notes while reading - saves having my head twisted to one side of the keyboard.

Pat

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