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Hi everyone! you're so fast in replying (thank you!), i couldn't help but ask another question... Thank you again in advance! ;)

 

In our project, we have about 300 text files, and our tree is constructed as following: 15 nodes, 9 sub-nodes and 24 sub-sub nodes, totaling approx. 2300 nodes in all... :blink: We are trying to think of a new way of arranging the tree so it could be less of a burden to run... But is there actually a specific limit in the number of possible nodes and sub-nodes?

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That does sound a large number of nodes! I wonder if you're not using NVivo to its best. It's more manageable and flexible to group types of things and code doubly and then to query your project than it is to create a separate tree node for every eventuality. Do you have a lot of repetition at your sub-levels? For instance, if you coded like this:

 

Person A

= Drink

- Whiskey

- Gin

- Wine

- Beer

= Food

- Cake

- Chocolate

- Ice-cream

 

Person B

= Drink

- Whiskey

- Gin

- Wine

- Beer

= Food

- Cake

- Chocolate

- Ice-cream

 

Person C

= Drink

- Whiskey

- Gin

- Wine

- Beer

= Food

- Cake

- Chocolate

- Ice-cream

 

and so on for 50 people, you'd have a lot of coding duplication which makes it hard to manage your coding scheme and perhaps also harder to retain conceptual clarity.

 

A more efficient way of coding would be to group your nodes into trees based on the kind of thing it is and then to code for person, drink(s) and foods:

 

People

- A

- B

- C

 

Drink

- Whiskey

- Gin

- Wine

- Beer

 

Food

- Cake

- Chocolate

- Ice-cream

 

Tom Richards has a paper on this somewhere, but I can't lay my hands on it at present. Perhaps Lyn could give us a reminder?

 

Hope this gives you some ways of thinking about your coding scheme. :blink:

 

Duncan

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  • 2 weeks later...

It's the wrong Lyn answering here I realise, and no doubt Lyn Richards could give a more detailed reply, but I think the paper that Duncan's referring to is "Why Qualitative Computing is Radically Changing Qualitative Research". This used to be located on the QSR website but seems to no longer be there - a shame, as it was really useful.

 

There's a reasonably lengthy discussion of the paper elsewhere on the Forum however that you may find useful:

http://forums.qsrinternational.com/index.p...pic=743&hl=

 

Kind regards, Lyn

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Thank you Lyn and Duncan, indeed my tree was a disaster, and we managed to reorganize it in a much more efficient and manageable way! :)

 

As for the article - it looks so interesting, I'll try to make a suggestion so that Tom Richards could make it available again - it could bring a new light to the approach and help soooo many new users... :)

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